Saturday, March 12, 2016

Men's Historical Vest--Butterick 6339

I did it!  I finally made something for my husband!  Sewing for my husband was a long time coming and well overdue.  I don't know why, but sewing for myself and my children just seems so much easier.  Tackling men's wear wasn't something I thought I was ready for or quite honest, something I would do well at.



Here he is sporting his new vest made with Butterick 6339, one of the historical patterns.



My husband picked out his own fabric and I am so happy he did--it looks amazing on him!

If you think you may ever want or need a men's vest, don't wait picking this gem of a pattern up!    The vest is fully lined and has welt pockets.  I have made a couple of welt pockets in my sewing adventures, but didn't feel confident in sewing them with this brocade.  It is not a fabric you want to make mistakes with and have to pick out your stitches.  



I referred to some Youtube video tutorials.  Thank goodness for the people who take time out of their day to make them for people like me who need a little extra hand holding.  My welt pockets went in flawlessly!

There is a discrepancy in the pattern instructions.  The pattern envelope states sew-in interfacing.  However, the pattern sheets say "fuse."  If you saw my last post here, you know that I have been working on vests for my children as well.  This gave me an opportunity to work with different interfacing to determine what worked best for me.  I definitely prefer sew-in interfacing for this project.  I had never made vests before and was surprised at how much interfacing goes into one.  The entire front of the vest, as well as collars and welt pocket pieces.

For my son's, I used fusible interfacing, and following pattern instructions, I fused it to both upper and under collar pieces.  This caused the collar to be quite stiff and not lie flat as you can see below.  This could be a result of using too heavy of an interfacing, but I did trim my seams to reduce bulk and clipped curves. 



 However, for my husbands, I used a single layer of sew-in interfacing for the collars, medium weight, which provided enough structure to the vest and collar pieces but not making it stiff.  Also, I sewed the darts into the vest front before basting the interfacing to pieces.  The pattern instructions are to place the interfacing first, but I wasn't sure how to sufficiently do that with the darts.  I thought that would be really bulky in that area.  This is probably just my inexperience, but what I did worked, so I am pleased with the results.


I loved matching my daughter's skirt to my husband's vest!  How often can you have a Daddy/Daughter outfit?  To see more about my daughter's skirt, check out my "Sewing with Brocade post" here.





Thanks for stopping by ~ Shirley

11 comments:

  1. These vests are fantastic and your party looks like it went well! Your husband looks pleased with your work so maybe you'll get a list from him now... :D
    I like the interfacing on your husband's vest better; you live, you learn though :D Your son's vest still looks smashing!!

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    1. I asked my husband if he ever though he would wear the vest again and he said he will be sure to find a reason to! I feel so successful at the moment LOL. I can see getting a lot of use out of this pattern because I can make my son vests in more casual-type fabrics or suitings to go with dress pants. Uh oh, you're right, the requests for making other garments may now be in the works! ha ha

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  2. I know I've said it before, but is there anything you can't sew, Shirley. Your hubby looks very pleased with his new vest, and so he should be - so, so professionally sewn. Love the daddy / daughter matching outfits. Your daughter's shoes caught my eye, too.

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    1. Featured today, Shirley, both your vest and blog.

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    2. Thank you Pam! I was so nervous to sew this up for my husband. Now that I have finally made something, I hope the next project will have less anxiety for me. LOL I love those shoes too! I miss not living in Europe, for many reasons, but oh the shoes we were able to find! So much cheaper than the U.S. too. My girls miss our local shoe store we use to frequent where we use to live.

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  3. Fabulous waistcoats. The boys do get slightly overlooked in our house too. Much easier to sew for my daughters. I've made shirts for my husband and son, plus trouser for the youngest. I love the idea of making a waistcoat, because of the fabric choices. Your fabric looks wonderful.

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    1. Thank you Cheryl! I love to sew for my son (and he loves it too). I don't know why I feel so intimidated sewing for my husband. I guess I just want it to perfection for him and I know that the little ones won't ever see the mistakes if made when sewing for them. :) But the way my 14-year-old son is growing, he will soon be in adult sizes anyway so I should overcome this intimidation of sewing with men's wear!

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  4. I'm over here from Threading My Way. Your vest is awesome. I would also do sew-in interfacing on this particular material and you did it perfectly - do the darts first then cover with interfacing. The dart would have been too bulky per the directions. I do this when bag making. If I piece the front, I will do all that seaming and iron my seams flat before adding the fusible interfacing. Off to look at what else you make.

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    1. Thank you Kathy! I'm so glad to hear I did it right. I tried to look online and couldn't find anything that would explain how to do it properly.

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  5. I'm using this pattern for the final step of closing the vest, the instructions are a bit vague. How did you do it? Tia

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    1. Hi Jessica. If you are making one like my husband's that has two sets of buttons, one set is just sewn to the vest (for looks) while the other set of buttons are functional. The right side of the jacket (when it is on the body), that is underneath closest to the chest, will need a small buttonhole at the top inner edge to keep this closed when the jacket is buttoned up. You will be making a small button hole at the right top (#38 for View C). Then you will sew a small button to the lining (the top left side of the vest) on the INSIDE attached to the LINING. This keeps that flap of the jacket in place so it doesn't flop around. I hope that helps!

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